5 Ways to bring the colours of Wimbledon into your home

As one of the oldest and most prestigious tournaments in the world, Wimbledon has long been associated with the start of the Great British Summer and the beautiful character of the venue embodies traditional Britishness. From the lush green grass, strawberries and cream to the red, white and blue of the Union Jack traipsed over the shoulders of the ever hopeful British public (no pressure Andy!), Wimbledon is full of history and is rich in a wide variety of shades. With one of the longest running traditions in the world,  their famed strict rule of all-white clothes (even the soles of the footwear must comply) dating back to the start of the Championships in 1877, together with their famous dark green and purple logo, there is plenty of inspiration all around.

To celebrate the start of Wimbledon we take a closer look at the colours that have made this historic event so famous, scroll down for some Wimbledon style inspiration and colour palettes to inspire.

 On Court

An Ariel Shot of the Wimbledon

An Ariel Shot of the Wimbledon. Image available from Sports Travel Experts.

1.Wimbledon Logo

The famed Wimbledon logo comes in three strong colours, bringing a sense of luxury to the Championships. The green, white and purple, which are used on the logo have long been associated with the area. It is believed that they were adopted because of their association with the Wimbledon area, after the Wimbledon Militant Suffragette movement adopted them in 1908.

Left to right: Breakfast Room Green, Pelt, All White, all from Farrow & Ball

Left to right: Breakfast Room Green, Pelt, All White, all from Farrow & Ball

 2.Strawberries and Cream

Strawberries and Cream at Wimbledon

Strawberries and Cream at Wimbledon

Another famous tradition found at Wimbledon is the consumption of strawberries and cream (regardless of the weather). Originally only strawberries would be served in 1953 before cream was later introduced in the 1970’s. Over time they have been a much loved tradition for fans to enjoy whilst watching the tennis. During the fortnight of play, it is believed that over 28,000 kilos of strawberries and over 7,000 litres of cream are consumed.

Rectory Red and Wimborne White, both from Farrow & Ball

Rectory Red and Wimborne White, both from Farrow & Ball

3.The Wimbledon Trophies

Each year the 128 entrants in the men’s and ladies’ draws contest for the famous trophies, handed to the winners.  Made in 1864, the ladies trophy (better know as the “Venus Rosewater Dish”) was first awarded in 1886. It is made of silver, and the decorations around the edges of the trophy are mythological themed.

The Gentlemen’s Trophy first awarded a year after the ladies trophy in 1877, is also known as the “Challenge Cup”, although gold in appearance is in fact made of silver-gilt. It is inscribed with the words “The All England Lawn Tennis Club Single Handed Champion of the World”. The below wallpapers are a great way of incorporating the prestige of Wimbledon within an interior scheme.

Shouchikubai 4502 and 4503. Both from Farrow & Ball

Shouchikubai 4502 and 4503. Both from Farrow & Ball

4.Wimbledon Flowers

Another of the traditions at Wimbledon is the beautifully kept flowers, which have been expertly maintained by a team of gardeners year round. They are located all around the ground, and help to add beauty to the Championships every year. The flowers above have been carefully chosen to reflect, and keep in line with the traditional Wimbledon colour scheme.

Left to Right: Brassica, Olive and Pointing. All from Farrow & Ball

Left to Right: Brassica, Olive and Pointing. All from Farrow & Ball

5.The Union Jack

Andy Murray Holding with the  British Flag during the Olympics at Wimbledon. Image via Eurosport

Andy Murray holding the Union Jack during the Olympics at Wimbledon. Image via Eurosport

Bouquet of Flowers in the British Colours. Image available here

Bouquet of Flowers in the British Colours. Image available here



The Chromologist

About

The Chromologist is a colour whisperer. He understands and knows them better than they know themselves, translating their pleas to be used beautifully for humankind. It's unknown from whence he came. Some say the fraction of space between a prism and a spectrum, others say he toiled in the fabled colour mines of Svalbard for years untold, deep underground, speaking only to the reds and blues, cerises and aquas, bronze and golds...


The Chromologist 2019 | Farrow & Ball

The Chromologist